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Medicines pose a greater risk to young children than chemicals


Most parents are aware of the dangers of household chemicals to the little ones. However, according to experts, it is not in the sink or in the garage that our children are most at risk, but in the medicine cabinet.

Medicines pose a greater risk to young children than chemicals

Childhood Two-thirds of the poisonings are medications. Drugs are twice as likely to cause poisoning as cleansers, cosmetics, and herbal remedies. Children have much more access to medicines and parents have a lot of confidence in child-resistant caps. Adults are often left out of long-term drugs, many of the drugs look like candies, and anti-cough syrups are good. This is almost a guarantee of accidents. The most common poisoning is with non-prescription drugs that are found in almost every household in the US. In children younger than 5 years, the most common cause (10 percent) is analgesics. In addition, a total of 21.5 percent are responsible for a variety of creams and ointments, as well as antimicrobials and antitussives, vitamin supplements, and digestion aids.
"Parents think that prescription-only medications are safe, because buying them is very simple," said Jay L. Schauben, chief medical officer for the Maritime Information Center in Florida. "We are more prone to abandon them and children are more likely to swallow them because they think they have found candy." Young children are especially vulnerable because they tend to put everything in their mouths, so they know their surroundings.
To prevent accidents keep all medicines in a lockable cupboard, where children cannot boil. Do not leave medicine on the counter or on the bedside table, even if the glasses have a child-resistant cap. It is just a matter of asking when the little one comes to know how to open the drug bottle. Parents also need to be aware that the medicines they bring with them are also a source of danger.
Fortunately, childhood drug poisoning rarely results in death, with 1.3 million cases in 2008, with only 26 mph. Call an ambulance immediately if your child is not awake, has difficulty breathing, or has a seizure. In Hungary, you can call the Toxicology Department at Heim P Children's Hospital, as there is no need for hospital treatment in many cases.
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